TOTS START FIGURING OUT WRITING EVEN BEFORE ABCS

An  article in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch of 1/10/16 says that an experiment finds youngsters grasp that words have different meaning than their drawing. Some of the highlights indicate that scribbling is a vehicle for language and a precursor to reading. It is an additional way to consider reading readiness, beyond the emphasis on phonetics or being able to point out an “A” in the alphabet chart. A child calls it a family portrait when it may look like a bunch of grapes. It is a great open door into the world of symbolic thought, according to the researcher, Hirsh-Pasek.

Strategies to help young kids read and write are:
1) Run a finger under the text when reading to youngsters, otherwise, they will pay more attention to the pictures according to Brett Miller of the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development.
2) Show children how you write their names well before they can attempt it said Temple University psychology professor athy Kirs-Pasek.
3) Encourage youngsters to invent their own spellings of other words after their name to spur them to write more according to developmental psychologist, Rebecca Treiman of Washington University in St. Louis.
4) When youngsters scribble, don’t guess what they produced-ask, Hirsh-Pasek said. It’s discouraging if a tot is about to announce he wrote a story and mom thinks he drew a house.
5) Post a scribble they are proud of on the refrigerator and they will figure out patterns with their scribbles. That’s more instructive than merely pasting copies of apples onto a page to make a recognizable picture according to Hirsh-Pasek.
6) Give tots a pencil or pen instead of a crayon if they say they want to “write” instead of “draw” so it will look more like text, Treiman said.

Remember to read to your children.  That is the foundation to learn to read.

If you want to make a speech therapy  appointment,  please contact my website at  www.interactivetherapy.net.  I also have a facebook page and twitter page where you can a plethora of information.

Pam Hass, Speech Language Pathologist

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES TO DO AT HOME: PART 3

HAPPY NEW YEAR from  Interactive Therapy Inc.

This is a continuation of Part 2 of language activities to do at home to facilitate communication and interaction at home and in the community.

21.  Take your child on field trips.  There are many places in the St. Louis area which can provide your child with an enjoyable and enriching experience.

22.  Talk about the days of the week, the month and what will be happening that day, week, or month.

23.   Talk about the weather and how it looks today.  Discuss what type of clothes you need to wear  on the particular day.

24.  As each holiday approaches, discuss what it involves and what will be happening in your home.

25.  Talk about each season as it happens during the year.  Show and discuss the physical changes you see.

26.  Have your child say the word that finishes a riddle.  “Who delivers the mail?” (mail carrier).  “I bounce the  ________.”

25.  Read a story to your child, pausing at certain places, leaving out words; the child is to supply the missing word.

27.  To teach a child to ask questions, have him ask questions, have him ask questions concerning the location of a hidden object until it is found.

28.  Play descriptive games, e.g. “I Spy”.  Describe an object and have the child guess what it is, e.g. I have fur, a tail, four legs, and bark.”  “What am I?” (dog).  Also let your child try to describe something and you guess what it is he is describing.

29.  A deck of playing cards provides excellent teaching materials for matching and naming suits, pictures, numbers, and sets.

30.  Listening for sounds.  Have your child close his eyes and listen to the sounds going on around him.  Have him verbally identify what he hears.  Talk abut whether the sound is loud or soft, near or far away, high or low.

31.  Play Simon Says.  This gets the child to listen to commands auditorily and transfer commands to movements of body parts.

If you want more information or to schedule an appointment, please go to www.interactivetherapy.net.

 

Pam Hass, Speech Language Pathologist