Tag Archives: communication

LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES TO DO AT HOME: PART 3

HAPPY NEW YEAR from  Interactive Therapy Inc.

This is a continuation of Part 2 of language activities to do at home to facilitate communication and interaction at home and in the community.

21.  Take your child on field trips.  There are many places in the St. Louis area which can provide your child with an enjoyable and enriching experience.

22.  Talk about the days of the week, the month and what will be happening that day, week, or month.

23.   Talk about the weather and how it looks today.  Discuss what type of clothes you need to wear  on the particular day.

24.  As each holiday approaches, discuss what it involves and what will be happening in your home.

25.  Talk about each season as it happens during the year.  Show and discuss the physical changes you see.

26.  Have your child say the word that finishes a riddle.  “Who delivers the mail?” (mail carrier).  “I bounce the  ________.”

25.  Read a story to your child, pausing at certain places, leaving out words; the child is to supply the missing word.

27.  To teach a child to ask questions, have him ask questions, have him ask questions concerning the location of a hidden object until it is found.

28.  Play descriptive games, e.g. “I Spy”.  Describe an object and have the child guess what it is, e.g. I have fur, a tail, four legs, and bark.”  “What am I?” (dog).  Also let your child try to describe something and you guess what it is he is describing.

29.  A deck of playing cards provides excellent teaching materials for matching and naming suits, pictures, numbers, and sets.

30.  Listening for sounds.  Have your child close his eyes and listen to the sounds going on around him.  Have him verbally identify what he hears.  Talk abut whether the sound is loud or soft, near or far away, high or low.

31.  Play Simon Says.  This gets the child to listen to commands auditorily and transfer commands to movements of body parts.

If you want more information or to schedule an appointment, please go to www.interactivetherapy.net.

 

Pam Hass, Speech Language Pathologist

 

 

LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES TO DO AT HOME

This is a continuation of last week’s language activities to increase vocabulary and to facilitate interaction and communication.

11. Play a game of following commands such as, “Bring me the spoon and the glass.” or “Close the door and turn on the light.” This teaches your child to listen and follow directions.

12. Use prepositions to play listening games. “Put the spoon in the glass.” Put the car behind the chair.” Where is the car?” “Put the cup between the forks.”

13. Hide objects in the room and have your child tell where he/she found them.

14. Help your child learn colors, shapes, and sizes by talking about objects in his/her everyday world. “This is a big, red, ball.” “It is round and it bounces.”

15. Take turns talking about things as you do them: “I am stirring.” “You are washing.” “I am dancing.” “We are shopping.”

16. Talk about how foods taste, look, feel, smell and sound as you eat them.

17. Count things as you do them, like buttoning, climbing steps, and setting the table.

18. Collect a box of junk. Take turns guessing what is in the box by the way it feels (close your eyes of course) or by the way it sounds when it is shaken or banged on the side.

19. Using measuring spoons, measuring cups, bowls and cans, put them in order from small to large and talk about which one is the smallest, biggest, and in the middle.

20. Play songs. Sing with your child. Nursery rhymes and simple songs build vocabulary and grammar.

If you want more information or to schedule an appointment with Interactive Therapy, go to www.interactivetherapy.net.

Pamela Hass
Speech Language Pathologist

LEARNING NEW WORDS: PART 3

Using natural activities will increase vocabulary.  When your child needs to learn a “target” word, try these activities:

  1. Find five pictures depicting the word and tape them in five major doorways throughout your house.  Place the pictures at your child’s eye level.  Now establish the “rule” that whenever a family member goes through that doorway, and your child is within listening distance, the family member must say the word or a short phrase containing the word.
  2. Use the word in some of your family’s favorite songs.
  3. Have your child participate in activities in which the word occurs (folding clothes, mealtime, playing with toys, dressing, bathtime, etc.). Use the word repeatedly throughout the activity.
  4. Encourage your child to use the word, but without too much pressure.  Continue the activities described to help the child listen to the word and see how using the word can influence other people.
Using activities of daily living to help your child learn new words and using the words repeatedly in the activity will help your child retain the word.  Praise your child for using the word in conversation when it occurs.
Reference:  The strategies were taken from Communication Skill Builders by Leslie S. McColgin.
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